English | 2020 | ISBN: 0806164603 | 281 pages | True PDF | 17.56 MB

Like America itself, the architecture of the United States is an amalgam, an imitation or an importation of foreign forms adapted to the natural or engineered landscape of the New World. So can there be an "American School" of architecture? The most legitimate claim to the title emerged in the 1950s and 1960s at the Gibbs College of Architecture at the University of Oklahoma, where, under the leadership of Bruce Goff, Herb Greene, Mendel Glickman, and others, an authentically American approach to design found its purest expression, teachable in its coherence and logic. Followers of this first truly American school eschewed the forms most in fashion in American architectural education at the time-those such as the French Beaux Arts or German Bauhaus Schools-in favor of the vernacular and the organic. The result was a style distinctly experimental, resourceful, and contextual-challenging not only established architectural norms in form and function but also traditional approaches to instructing and inspiring young architects.